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[1996-2012] Michael S Jenkins eBooks [Stock Market]

bonnie1234

Active member
[2009] Michael Jenkins - Secret Angle Method

[2009] Michael Jenkins - Secret Angle Method

[2009] Michael Jenkins - Secret Angle Method
 

bonnie1234

Active member
[2007] Michael S Jenkins eBooks [Chart Reading, Trading]

[2007] Michael S Jenkins eBooks [Chart Reading, Trading]

Michael S Jenkins - Basic Day Trading Techniques 2007


Michael S Jenkins - Chart Reading for Professional Traders
 

araa

New member
[2009] Michael Jenkins - Secret Angle Method
hello bonnie1234 this book (the secret angle method ) have a cd compiuter .
You must be registered for see images


if you have this file please send for me .

did you study this book ? how is it?

thanks
 

shahab

New member
HI

Michael S. Jenkins masterpiece 'Square The Range Trading System'

I want this book, who can help me
 

Easyphoto

New member
Dear Bonnie

Thanks a lot.

Do you have Michael Jenkins - MTA video ?

In May 2009 Mr. Jenkins gave an hour and a half presentation before the Market Technicians Association in which he explains many of his proprietary methods and showing how to calculate many of the highs and lows since 1998 exactly to the day and within a few cents of the actual price. Thanks




Michael Jenkins - The Geometry Of Stock Market Profits
 

bonnie1234

Active member
Dear Bonnie

Thanks a lot.

Do you have Michael Jenkins - MTA video ?

In May 2009 Mr. Jenkins gave an hour and a half presentation before the Market Technicians Association in which he explains many of his proprietary methods and showing how to calculate many of the highs and lows since 1998 exactly to the day and within a few cents of the actual price. Thanks

I do not have any videos ...only ebooks

Please place your [REQ] in the videos thread and someone may help you?
 

Fmfx

Member
Hi guys

I have been trying to understand the maths and concept in the book "Secret Angle Method" but couldn't.

Can someone who has read and understands it pls put me through? I will be very grateful.

BWT what charting platform did he use to calculate the degrees etc?

Thanks.
Regards
 

ddam3

Member
BWT what charting platform did he use to calculate the degrees etc?

Thanks.
Regards

The answer to this question is on page three of the book in the Acknowledgement. I would recommend Ensign as it has all of the features necessary to apply this method. You should probably read and reread the book and and apply the method page by page as it is really not that difficult to follow.
 

Fmfx

Member
The answer to this question is on page three of the book in the Acknowledgement. I would recommend Ensign as it has all of the features necessary to apply this method. You should probably read and reread the book and and apply the method page by page as it is really not that difficult to follow.
Thanks. But I have read the book over 10 times and still can't understand a thing, except for the fibo projection.

Pls kindly give me some tips or anything, I will be very grateful.

Regards
 

bonnie1234

Active member
Michael S Jenkins - Square the Range Trading System 2012

Michael S Jenkins - Square the Range Trading System 2012

Michael S Jenkins - Square the Range Trading System 2012


Code:
http://www.stockcyclesforecast[dot]com/SCF10.html

Enjoy!
 

imgekko

Member
Frankly, Who can tell me how Michael Jenkins sets his time/price scale in his book 'Square The Range Trading System' ? I don't see how he set his diameter when he draw a circle on his price chart. His circles can be easily adjusted to an ellipse.
 

Brumby

Member
Jenkin's method might look good on paper but it is very difficult to apply in real time trading. I am not saying his methods are useless - just that it is very difficult to apply correctly in practice. This is an issue that applies to all geometric tools and is compounded when conversion factors are involved. I use median lines as part of my trading tools and I can show you beautiful turning points being captured by the lines but problem is this is normally in hindsight. The point is, this type of tools are very difficult to apply correctly. The science part will tell you the method but is the art part that tells you how and when to selectively apply. If not, you will end up with a chart clutted with full of lines. I think the best way to progress on this is if you can actually find someone who will mentor you on its application. If not, I think it will be a very difficult and frustrating passage.
 

Brumby

Member
Frankly, Who can tell me how Michael Jenkins sets his time/price scale in his book 'Square The Range Trading System' ? I don't see how he set his diameter when he draw a circle on his price chart. His circles can be easily adjusted to an ellipse.
Having thought about my earlier post which probably wasn't very helpful other than the point that any application is difficult, I will try to answer your question as best that I can. However before that I want to tell you a relevant story regarding this subject. This was told by Tim Morge regarding a rivalry that existed between Dr Andrews (Median Lines) and WD Gann in their days. There was one day when Dr. Andrews heard in the next room WD Gann talking about the magical 45 degree angle that would be able to predict price movements. Dr. Andrews being a mathematician challenged that notion because a 45 degree angle is dynamic and not static as it is dependent on the dimensions of the measurement. In other words, the slope of a 45 degree angle is different between a rectangle and a square. Herein lies the issue of the ratio to apply to price/time i.e. the conversion factor. The problem that you will notice is that both Gann and Jenkins talk in simplistic terms of using a 1:1 ratio in examples but we know in practice there are specfic scaling actors dependent on the instrument. Unfortunately they conveniently skip through this point. The question is do they actually know or is it a trade secret that do not wish to divulge.

So to your question, what do you do? You can apply different scaling factors and see what fits. This is basically trial and error and will be an immencely frustrating passage and dangerous if apply to your trading account. Therefore exercise caution. The only clue I can offer is this - the whole notion of geometric tool regardless of type, is the belief that there is a certain specfic vibration and the aim is to capture it so that a roadmap can be known of their turning points. It should also be noted that all vibration has a decay element to it i.e. it works only for as long as it works. Don't get married to it. A vibration has to first prove itself before you can use it. This is no different from a trendline where it has to be tested before you can rely on it. Hope this is helpful.
 

usyou

New member
Actually, no

Actually, no

... The problem that you will notice is that both Gann and Jenkins talk in simplistic terms of using a 1:1 ratio in examples but we know in practice there are specfic scaling actors dependent on the instrument. Unfortunately they conveniently skip through this point. The question is do they actually know or is it a trade secret that do not wish to divulge. ..
No, Jenkins actually *does* address this ... he uses the slope of the first move away from an extreme as the 1:1 line. Perhaps you should read his work more carefully. The "instrument", btw, doesn't matter; it applies equally to stocks, futures, bonds, etc.
 

Brumby

Member
No, Jenkins actually *does* address this ... he uses the slope of the first move away from an extreme as the 1:1 line. Perhaps you should read his work more carefully. The "instrument", btw, doesn't matter; it applies equally to stocks, futures, bonds, etc.
Are you actually saying that there are no scaling (conversion) factors involved as they are strictly 1:1 ratio and this applies to all instruments? Can you please point to the page that he actually says this.
 

parisboy

Member
The " squaring out " of Price and Time has little to do with a "square" but a lot with the Pythagorean equation. a^2 + b^2 = c^2.

Which from a "gannish" point of view can be translated as : Price^2 x Time^2 = (Angle (1x1)^2.

The improperly named "45° angle" is the (1 Price Unit x 1 Time Unit) Angle and is in fact also a moving average which describes (relative) Speed, Acceleration, Momentum and Sentiment.

The "scaling" question can be resolved by using the octave system version 2 of Gann.

Version 1.0 was the division by 8 of the distance between a high and a low.

Inconvenient was :

a) which high and which low ?
b) every time price makes a new high or a new low everything has to be recalculated.

At the end of his life Gann has improved the system by developping a "fractal of price"

0/10, 0-100, 0-1000, 0-10.000, 0-100.000

you just have to divide these "fractal of price " by 8 which gives you the octave ( the specific vibration) of the instrument whose prices fluctuates in this "fractal".

Each octave can be divided by 8 in sub-octaves.

This version was popularized by TH Murrey (Murrey Math).

Some well informed people have written at the time that Murrey has "borrowed" his system from Gann :eek:
 

ddam3

Member
It is my opinion that Jenkins methods must be worked with consistently in order for them to have any value Mr Jenkins says himself on page 7 that scaling WILL be a problem, but wont negate the validity of the method. but only cause a bit more work and testing. Do not sleep on him
 

Brumby

Member
The " squaring out " of Price and Time has little to do with a "square" but a lot with the Pythagorean equation. a^2 + b^2 = c^2.

Which from a "gannish" point of view can be translated as : Price^2 x Time^2 = (Angle (1x1)^2.

The improperly named "45° angle" is the (1 Price Unit x 1 Time Unit) Angle and is in fact also a moving average which describes (relative) Speed, Acceleration, Momentum and Sentiment.

The "scaling" question can be resolved by using the octave system version 2 of Gann.

Version 1.0 was the division by 8 of the distance between a high and a low.

Inconvenient was :

a) which high and which low ?
b) every time price makes a new high or a new low everything has to be recalculated.

At the end of his life Gann has improved the system by developping a "fractal of price"

0/10, 0-100, 0-1000, 0-10.000, 0-100.000

you just have to divide these "fractal of price " by 8 which gives you the octave ( the specific vibration) of the instrument whose prices fluctuates in this "fractal".

Each octave can be divided by 8 in sub-octaves.

This version was popularized by TH Murrey (Murrey Math).

Some well informed people have written at the time that Murrey has "borrowed" his system from Gann :eek:
I am not a student of Gann and so forgive my ignorance if I am going on the wrong track. Based on what you have said, the fractals of 8 applied against the range of prices would theoretically mean an almost endless combination of probable scaling factors. This in my view is not a very practical solution.
 

imgekko

Member
Brumby, thanks a lot for your explanation. My overall feeling is hindsight while reading that Jenkins book. I do think time/price scale is critical rather than a minor problem.

Usyou, it will be very much appreciated if you could point out which pages Jenkins talk about the scaling topic.

Parisboy, thanks. But I think I need to make my question clearer. Pythagorean theory is not relevant, put it aside. By Jenkins/Gann's 1:1, which could mean 1 Price Unit = 1 Time Unit, it is not enough to solve practical trading analysis. What is the price unit? what is the time unit? if price unit is a dollar, and time unit is a day. then please answer my question in the following format: 1 dollar=1day or 0.625dollars= 1day, etc. if, say, we have a scale 0.625 dollars=1day for the particular market in question, then I will know 0.625 dollars=4.5 hours(trading hours), when I change my timeframe of analysis. then I will have an equivalent 0.139 dollar=1 hour. That's practical enough. Otherwise, if you can not answer the question in this specific format, you may easily turn your circle having been drawn to an ellipse by adjusting your computer screen.
In short, maybe some one can tell 1 point( dollar)=x days. How to solve the x? no one answers. you need just test by trial and error, maybe starting from 1/8. how to test? maybe by hindsight. That's the way researchers write books. What if I don't like highsight, how can I do?
I hope I have expressed my question clear.
 
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